Space Launch Report:  SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.2 Data Sheet
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f9-21fts.jpg (9766 bytes)SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.2
Updated December 22, 2016

Vehicle Configurations

Vehicle Components

Merlin 1C-powered Falcon 9

Falcon 9 v1.1

Falcon 9 v1.2. Flight Log

First "Full Thrust" First Stage Hot Fire Test on September 21, 2015

During January, 2015, Martin Halliwell, SES chief technical officer, revealed that SpaceX was introducing a higher-thrust modification of its Merlin 1D engine, with about 20% more thrust, and that SES was deciding whether or not to be the first to fly with the new engine. The company was thinking about skipping its then-planned Spring 2015 launch slot to allow someone else to fly the "full-thrust" engine first.

That is how the world learned about plans for an upgraded Falcon 9, eventually to be known as Falcon 9 v1.2.

Elon Musk made it official on March 1, 2015, when he stated that Falcon 9 upgrades were planned that would allow for first stage landings during geosynchronous transfer missions. The upgrades would include a 15% increase in thrust, the use of "deep cryogenic", or "densified", liquid oxygen, and a 10% second stage tank volume increase.

Mr. Musk did not name the upgraded rocket at that time, so industry observers began identifying it as "Falcon 9 v1.2".

On March 9, Aviation Week & Space Technology reported that SES had decided, after all, to be the first "full thrust" Falcon 9 customer. SES 9, a communications satellite, would launched to geosynchronous transfer orbit by the new rocket during the second or third quarter of 2015. SES CEO Karim Michel Sabbagh announced the decision.

On March 17, 2015, SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell offered more details about the upgraded rocket. She said that the company had gone back to certify extra performance from Merlin 1D. She said "I don't know what we're going to call it. Enhanced Falcon 9, Falcon 9 v1.2, Full-Performance Falcon 9" - indicating that the company still had not decided on a name.

She said that the upgraded rocket would provide "about a 30% increase in performance, maybe a little more", while also allowing the first stage to be landed on a downrange ship platform during GTO missions.  The payload mass cutoff point for first stage return was not announced.  Without first stage return the new rocket may be able to boost more than 6 tonnes to GTO.

Shotwell also said that the upgraded Falcon 9 first stage would essentially be used as a side booster for Falcon Heavy, while the Falcon Heavy core would be a different design.

The announced upgrade meant that Falcon 9 would now lift off on 694 tonnes of sea level thrust rather than the previous 600 tonnes. Second stage Merlin 1D Vacuum thrust would increase to at least 95 tonnes force. The second stage engine would also use a longer nozzle to improve specific impulse, requiring a stretch of the interstage.

f9ft-39a.jpg (32042 bytes)Illustration of Falcon 9 v1.2 on Rebuilt LC 39A at Kennedy Space Center

During the summer of 2015, SpaceX continued to send mixed signals about the upgraded rocket's name. One presentation by SpaceX during the summer of 2015 identified it as "Falcon 9 Upgrade".  During September, 2015 the company began calling it "Falcon 9 v1.1 Full Thrust". By early 2016 that name had been dropped, apparently in favor of "Falcon 9 v1.2", which was the name filed with the FAA.

A test program involving "full thrust" Merlin engines was completed at McGregor, Texas during the summer. Meanwhile, the first "Full Thrust" first stage - serial production number 21 - departed the SpaceX Hawthorne, California factory at the end of August and arrived at McGregor a few days later.

On September 8, 2015, the stage was erected at the new ground-level test stand, the first stage to installed there. The stand is equipped with a below-grade flame trench. This stand, which should reduce noise imposed on neighboring communities during hot fire tests, had been completed in 2013.  It is also expected to be used for Falcon Heavy core hot fire testing.

On September 21, the stage performed a 15 second test firing. A full duration test was performed on November 19, 2015. The second stage was tested on November 22. 

The first stage arrived at Cape Canaveral during the morning of November 20.  On December 18, 2015, the first stage, topped by the second stage and integrated Orbcomm G2 payload, completed a brief static firing at SLC 40 after two days of scrubbed attempts that appeared to be ground-system related, as the test shook down new super-chilling equipment at the pad. 

As the stage entered testing, two launch sites were being prepared to handle both it and Falcon Heavy.  Space Launch Complex (SLC) 4 East at Vandenberg AFB underwent modifications that included changes to its erector transporter and the construction of a propellant densification plant.  Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center was being totally rebuilt for Falcon Heavy and Falcon 9 v1.2, with a new horizontal processing hangar built on the former crawlerway at the base of the pad and a new pair of railroad tracks leading up to the launch pad itself.

f9-21a.jpg (8130 bytes)Falcon 9 Launches, Lands

F9-21 Liftoff

SpaceX returned its Falcon 9 to service on December 22, 2015 when it boosted 11 Orbcomm satellites into orbit from Cape Canaveral, Florida. For the first time, a Falcon 9 first stage boosted back and landed near its launch site. The landing took place at Landing Zone 1 at the former site of Launch Complex 13.

The two-stage kerosene/LOX rocket, sidelined since a June launch failure, returned in upgraded form with higher thrust engines, a stretched second stage and interstage, and supercooled, condensed propellant. The improved rocket, identified initially by SpaceX as a "Falcon 9 v1.1 Full Thrust" but later as "Falcon 9 v1.2", was the 20th Falcon 9 to fly and the 21st produced.

Liftoff from SLC 40 took place at 01:29 UTC. The now 69.799 meter (229 foot) tall rocket, about 1.524 meters (5 feet) taller than v1.1, rose on 694 metric tons (1.53 million pounds) of thrust produced by its nine Merlin 1D first stage engines. Previous Falcon 9 v1.1 first stages produced 600 metric tons (1.323 million pounds) of thrust.

f9-21b.jpg (5430 bytes)F9-21 First Stage Lands at LZ-1 About 10 Minutes After Liftoff

The first stage fired for 2 minutes 20 seconds, separating four seconds later. The second stage ignited its improved Merlin Vacuum engine at 2 minutes 35 seconds to begin a nearly eight minute burn to reach a roughly 620 x 660 km x 47 deg orbit.

The eleven 172 kg Orbcomm satellites separated in sequence from their center-mounted support pillar beginning 15 minutes and ending 20 minutes after liftoff.

Meanwhile, the first stage performed a roughly 30 second boostback burn beginning about 3 minutes 50 seconds after launch and a 20 second reentry burn about 8 minutes after launch, both using three engines. A final, roughly 32 second single-engine landing burn using only the center engine took place just before the landing, about 10 minutes after liftoff. 

The stage landed near the center of the circular landing zone.  A small fire burned at the base of the stage for at least a half-minute after the center Merlin 1D engine shut down.


f9-21c.jpg (5010 bytes)First Stage Shortly After Landing

After spacecraft deployment, the upgraded second stage Merlin Vacuum engine restarted both to test its restart capability for future missions and to deorbit the stage in the Southern Ocean south of Australia.

After the mission, Elon Musk announced that the recovered first stage would be used, if possible, for propellant loading and static fire testing at the rebuilt LC 39 Pad A.  SpaceX had no plans to re-fly the stage.   The stage was moved to the new Horizontal Integration Facility at LC 39A a couple of days after its landing, where it was photographed and inspected.

During week of January 12, the stage was unexpectedly moved to SLC 40.  A crane was used to erected it on the stand rather than the usual erector.  On January 14, an unannounced static fire attempt was made and aborted after 2-3 seconds when one of the outer engine's thrust fluctuated.  After the test, Elon Musk tweeted that the engine would be borescoped and that it might have ingested something. The stage subsequently returned to LC 39A.

Launch Complex 13 supported 51 Atlas missile and Atlas Agena orbital launches from 1958-1978. The site's mobile service tower was demolished in 2005 and its blockhouse in 2012. SpaceX subsequently built an 86 meter (282 foot) diameter landing pad centered on the spot where the original Atlas missile service tower parked during launches.



f9-22-1.jpg (12182 bytes)Falcon 9 Launches SES 9 (Updated 03/06/16)

SpaceX's second Falcon 9 v1.2 with full thrust Merlin 1D engines boosted the SES 9 communications satellite into geosynchronous transfer orbit from Cape Canaveral, Florida on March 4, 2016. Liftoff from SLC 40 took place at 23:35 UTC. The 5,271 kg Boeing BSS-702HP satellite separated about 31 minutes 24 seconds later, after two burns by the second stage Merlin 1D Vacuum engine.

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk tweeted that SES 9 had been inserted into a transfer orbit with a 40,600 km apogee. It was the first Falcon 9 Upgrade geosynchronous transfer orbit mission. The second stage used a minimum residual shutdown to provide as much orbital energy as possible, with a target of 290 km x at least 39,300 km x 28 deg. SpaceX modified earlier plans to aim for a 26,000 km apogee at the behest of SES.

The insertion change made first stage recovery very unlikely, due to its extra velocity.   SpaceX announced before the launch that it did not expect a successful recovery.   A boost-back burn was not used.  The first stage only  performed a three-engine reentry burn and a never-before-attempted three-engine final landing burn, but did not survive its high-speed attempt to land on a converted barge positioned more than 600 km downrange. The stage impacted the barge, punching a hole through the steel deck.  It was the fourth failed barge landing attempt by a Falcon 9 first stage.

The success followed scrubbed launch attempts on February 24 and 25 due to supercooled LOX temperature issues, a T-0 abort on February 28 caused by a low thrust detection in one engine, and a cancelled try on March 1 resulting from excessive high altitude winds. Prior to the launch attempts, the first stage performed a brief static fire test on February 22.



f9-23a.jpg (6223 bytes)Falcon 9 Launches CRS 8, First Stage Lands at Sea

The 23rd Falcon 9 launch vehicle, the third upgraded v1.2 variant, successfully orbited the Dragon 10 spacecraft on NASA's CRS 8 International Space Station cargo hauling mission on April 8, 2016. After performing the initial mission boost, the rocket's first stage accomplished the first successful landing on a floating platform - the company's converted landing barge - positioned about 300 km northeast of the Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40 launch site. It was the fifth such attempt.

Liftoff took place at 20:43 UTC after no delays or scrubs.  Dragon was targeted toward a 200 x 360 km x 51.6 deg orbit. The spacecraft carried 3,136 kg of cargo, including the 1,413 kg Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) experiment in the unpressurized trunk section. At roughly 10.4 tonnes, the combined Dragon and cargo mass was the heaviest-payload yet launched by a Falcon 9.

f9-23b.jpg (11046 bytes)F9-23 First Stage After Landing

During its descent, the first stage perform three-engine boost-back and reentry burns, followed by a final single-engine landing burn.   Landing took place about 8 minutes 35 seconds after liftoff.

The F9-23 first stage had performed a static firing at SLC 40 on April 5.  After its successful static testing at McGregor, Texas during February, a ground equipment failure damaged multiple engines during a non-propulsive test.  The engines were repaired or replaced without causing significant delay to the launch schedule.

Dragon arrived at ISS on April 10, 2016. 

The landing platform with the first stage returned to Port Canaveral during the pre-dawn hours of April 12, 2016.  During the day, a crane picked up the stage from the barge and placed it onto a work stand on the dock.   After several days of processing which included leg removal, the stage was moved to the Launch Complex 39A HIF on April 19.



New Falcon 9 Performance Numbers Revealed

On April 30, 2016, SpaceX released new performance data for an improved Falcon 9 v1.2.  The two-stage rocket gross mass increased to about 564 tonnes, not including payload, and its liftoff thrust rose to 775.65 tonnes as Merlin 1D thrust was pushed upward again to 190,000 pounds (86.183 tonnes) at sea level.  For the first time, the company gave solid payload performance numbers for v1.2.  They were:  22.8 tonnes to LEO x 28.5 deg, 8.3 tonnes to GTO x 27 deg, and 5.5 tonnes GTO x 27 deg when the first stage was recovered downrange.  The cost for a flight with first stage recovery was listed at $62 million. 

 

f9-29x.jpg (13538 bytes)Falcon 9 and AMOS 6 Destroyed in Pre Launch Test

Screen Capture from USLaunchReport.com Video of F9-29 Explosion

A Falcon 9 rocket and its $200 million AMOS 6 satellite payload were destroyed during a pre-launch propellant loading and hot fire test exercise at Cape Canveral on September 1, 2016.  The test was planned to assure all was ready for a September 3 launch that would have placed 5.5 tonne AMOS 6 in geosynchronous transfer orbit. 

Early reports indicated that propellant loading was nearly completed and the test was about eight minutes away when a powerful explosion destroyed the rocket and satellite at about 9:07 AM Eastern Time.  A series of smaller explosions occurred during the following minutes as a fire raged at SLC 40 and a large plume of black smoke drifted across the Florida space center.  It was the largest pad explosion in the history of Cape Canaveral/Kennedy Space Center.

A few hours after the explosion, Elon Musk tweeted that the failure appeared to have begun at the second stage liquid oxygen tank.  SLC 40 was reported to have been heavily damaged, knocking it out of service.  A day after the failure, SpaceX announced that East Coast launch campaigns would move to Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 Pad A, which at the time was planned to be ready to support operations beginning in November, 2016.   

The AMOS 6 launch would have been the 29th Falcon launch, and the ninth by a Falcon 9 v1.2 variant.  The AMOS 6 first stage was test fired at McGregor, Texas on August 5, 2016 and arrived at Cape Canaveral some time after August 21. 

SpaceX subsequently determined that the cause was sudden overpressurization of the second stage liquid oxygen (LOX) tank due to the failure of a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) containing pressurized helium that was mounted inside the LOX tank.  Improper control of subcooled-LOX temperatures may have been involved.  Elon Musk suggested that LOX froze within or beneath the composite overwrapping, causing loss of COPV structural integrity.  SpaceX performed cryogenic loading tests, with some leading to failure, of small test vessels at its McGregor, Texas test site to confirm the failure mode.       


 
Vehicle Configurations

  LEO
Payload
(metric tons)
185 km x
(1) 28.5 deg (CC)
(2) 98 deg (VA)
(3) 9.1 deg (KW)
(4) 51.6 deg (CC)
Geosynchronous
Transfer Orbit
Payload
(metric tons)
185x35,788 km
x 27 deg
~1,800 m/s
from GEO
Escape
Velocty
Payload
(5)LEO+3,150 m/s
(6)LEO+3,750 m/s
Configuration Liftoff
Height
(meters)
Liftoff
Mass
(metric tons)

Price (2005)
$Millions

Falcon 9 Block 1 (Merlin 1C)
2010
9.0 t (1)
8.5 t (4)
3.4 t 2 t (5) 2 Stage Falcon 9 (Merlin 1C)
+ 3.6 m or 5.2 m PLF
53 m 318 t $35-55 m (2007)
Falcon 9 v1.1 (Merlin 1D)
2013
13.15 t (1) 4.85 t 2.9 t (est)(5) 2 Stage Falcon 9 v1.1 (Merlin 1D)
+ 3.6 m or 5.2 m PLF
69.2 m 505.8 t (max) $54-59.5 m (2013)
Falcon 9 v1.2 Initial
Sept 2015
~17.4 t (1) ~6.4 t ~3.8 t (est)(5) 2 Stage Falcon 9 v1.2 Initial
+ 3.6 m or 5.2 m PLF
~69.7 m? ~556 t (no p/l) $61.2 m (2015)
Falcon 9 v1.2
April 30, 2016
22.8 t (1) 8.3 t
5.5 t (1st stg recovery)
4.02 t (5) 2 Stage Falcon 9 v1.2
+ 3.6 m or 5.2 m PLF
69.982 m ~587 t (max p/l) $62 m (1st stg recovery)


Vehicle Components

Falcon 9
Stage 1 -
Block 1
Merlin 1C
Version

Estimated
Falcon 9
Stage 2
-
Block 1
Merlin 1C
Version
Estimated
Falcon 9
Stage 1 -
"v1.1"
Merlin 1D
Version

Estimated
Falcon 9
Stage 2
-
"v1.1"
Merlin 1D
Version
Estimated
Falcon 9
Stage 1 -
"v1.2" Initial
Merlin 1D Full Thrust
Version

Estimated
Falcon 9
Stage 2
-
"v1.2" Initial
Merlin 1D Full Thrust
Version
Estimated
Falcon 9
Stage 1 -
"v1.2"
Merlin 1D Full Thrust
Version

Estimated
Falcon 9
Stage 2
-
"v1.2"
Merlin 1D Full Thrust
Version
Estimated
Diameter (m) 3.66 m
3.66 m
3.66 m
3.66 m
3.66 m
3.66 m
3.66 m
3.66 m
Length (m) ~29 m (est)
not incl I/S
~10.1 m
incl I/S
~42.6 m (est)
not incl I/S
~12.6 m
incl I/S
~42.6 m (est)
not incl I/S
~13 m
incl I/S
~42.6 m (est)
not incl I/S
~13 m
incl I/S
Empty Mass (tonnes)
~19.24 t?
burnout
~3.1 t?
burnout
 ~19 t?
burnout
~4-4.5 t?
burnout
 ~27.2 t?
burnout
~4.5 t?
burnout
 ~27.2 t?
burnout
~4.5 t?
burnout
Propellant Mass (tonnes) ~239.3 t?
used
~48.9 t?
used
~385 t?
used
~93 t?
used
~411 t?
used
~111.5 t?
used
~418.7 t?
used
~111.5 t?
used
Total Mass (tonnes) ~258.5 t?
~52 t?
~404 t?
~99 t?
~438.2 t?
~116.0 t?
~445.9 t?
~116.0 t?
Engine Merlin 1C
Merlin Vac
Merlin 1D
Merlin 1D Vac
Merlin 1D FT
Merlin 1D Vac FT
Merlin 1D FT
Merlin 1D Vac FT
Engine Mfgr SpaceX
SpaceX
SpaceX
SpaceX
SpaceX
SpaceX
SpaceX
SpaceX
Fuel RP1
RP1
RP1
RP1
RP1
RP1
RP1
RP1
Oxidizer LOX
LOX
LOX
LOX
LOX
LOX
LOX
LOX
Thrust
(SL tons)
387.825 t

600.109 t

-
~694 t

-
~775.65 t

-
Thrust
(Vac tons)
442.938 t
42.18 t
680.396 81.647 t ~757 t 95.255 t ~846 t 95.255 t
ISP (SL sec) 266 s
-
282 s - 283 s? - 283 s? -
ISP (Vac sec) 304 s
336 s
311 s 340s 312 s? 348 s? 312 s? 348 s?
Burn Time (sec) 180 s 346 s 185 s? 375 s? 162 s 397 s 161 2 397 s
No. Engines 9 1 9 1 9 1 9 1
Comments
- - - - - - - -



        Falcon 9
Payload
Fairing

Diameter (m)       5.2 m
Length (m)       13.9 m
Empty Mass (tonnes)
      ~ 2.0 t?

Falcon 9 v1.1 and v1.2 Flight History 


Date    Vehicle        No.   Payload               Mass  Site  Orbit (kmxkmxdeg)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
09/29/13 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-6  Cassiope/5 Cubesats   0.6   VA 4E 500x1500x80    LEO [8]
12/03/13 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-7  SES 8                 3.183 CC 40 295x80000x20.8 GTO+[9]
01/06/14 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-8  Thaicom 6             3.016 CC 40 295x90000x22.5 GTO+[A]
04/18/14 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-9  CRS-3 Dragon         ~9.3   CC 40 313x332x51.6   LEO/ISS[10]
07/14/14 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-10 Orbcomm OG2 (6sats)   1.032 CC 40 614x743x47     LEO [11]
08/05/14 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-11 Asiasat 8             4.535 CC 40 185x35786x24.3 GTO
09/07/14 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-13 Asiasat 6             4.428 CC 40 184x35762x25.3 GTO
09/21/14 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-12 CRS-4 Dragon         ~9.3   CC 40 199x359x51.64  LEO/ISS
01/10/15 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-14 CRS-5 Dragon         ~9.54  CC 40 206x353x51.6   LEO/ISS[12]
02/11/15 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-15 DSCOVR                0.57  CC 40 187x1371156x37 EEO [13]
03/02/15 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-16 Eutelsat 115WB/ABS 3A 4.159 CC 40 400x63300x24.8 GTO+
04/14/15 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-18 CRS-6 Dragon         ~9.24  CC 40 199x364x51.65  LEO/ISS[14]
04/27/15 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-17 TurkmenAlem 52E       4.5   CC 40 180x36600x25.5 GTO 
06/28/15 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-20 CRS-7 Dragon         ~9.2   CC 40               [FTO][15]
12/22/15 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-21 Orbcomm OG2           1.892 CC 40 620x660x47     LEO [16]
01/17/16 Falcon 9 v1.1 F9-19 Jason 3               0.553 VA 4E 1305x1320x66   LEO [17]
03/04/16 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-22 SES 9                 5.271 CC 40 290x40600x28   GTO [18]
04/08/16 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-23 CRS 8 Dragon        ~10.36  CC 40 200x360x51.6   LEO/ISS[19]
05/06/16 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-24 JCSAT 14              4.696 CC 40 189x35957x23.7 GTO [20]
05/27/16 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-25 Thiacom 8             3.025 CC 40 350x90226x21.2 GTO+[21]
06/15/16 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-26 Eutelsat 117WB/ABS2A ~4.15  CC 40 395x62591x24.7 GTO+[22]
07/18/16 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-27 CRS 9 Dragon         ~9.5   CC 40 200x360x51.6   LEO/ISS [23]
08/14/16 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-28 JCSAT 16              4.6   CC 40 184x35912x20.9 GTO [21]
09/01/16 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-29 AMOS 6                5.5   CC 40               [PAD][24]
01/14/17 Falcon 9 v1.2 F9-30 Iridium Next 1-10     8.6   VA 4E 667x86.4       LEO [25]
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[8] First Falcon 9 v1.1. First VAFB SLC 4E launch of Falcon 9. 
     1st stage performed two reentry burns (3 and 1 engine), but 2nd 
     burn cutoff early due high roll rates. 2nd stage restart for 
     disposal burn failed. 
[9] First Falcon 9 GTO+ launch.  Targeted 295 x 80,000 km x 20.75 degree 
      supersynchronous transfer orbit.  Stg 1 briefly restarted post sep.
      Fire reported in Stg1 octaweb during ascent.
[A] Lower than planned fuel reserves reported at end of final Stg2 burn.
      Planned orbit achieved.
[10] First Falcon 9 fitted with extending landing legs.  First stage 
      performed two retro burns after separation, lowering itself to a 
      simulated landing in the Atlantic off the Georgia/S. Carolina coast.
[11] 2nd Falcon 9 with legs.  First stage performed two retro burns and 
      landed in Atlantic but exploded during tip over.
[12] 1st stg attempted landing on converted barge about 320 km downrange, 
      but landed hard on barge and was lost.
[13] 187 x 1,371,156 km x 37 degree insertion orbit.  DSCVR bound for Earth-Sun L1.
      Stg 1 barge landing attempt abandoned due high seas. 
[14] First stage landed hard on downrange landing platform and was destroyed.
[15] Broke up at about T+2m 19sec, before staging, due Stg2 LOX tank overpress.
[16] First stage boosted back to CC LZ-1 (former LC 13) and landed.  Performed 
      boostback, reentry, and landing burns using 3, 1, and 1 engine.  First 
      Falcon 9 v1.2 (Full Thrust) flight.
[17] First stage landed on downrange landing platform, but one leg failed to 
      lock in place.  Stage fell over and was destroyed.
[18] First stage landing on downrange platform failed.
[19] 3,136 kg cargo, incl 1,413 kg BEAM in trunk.  1st stg landed on barge 
      (1st barge success).
[20] First stage landed on downrange platform.  First GTO landing.  First 
       successful 3-engine landing.
[21] First stage landed on downrange platform.
[22] First stage destroyed during landing attempt on downrange platform.  One of 
       three engines produced low thrust during final landing burn.  Stage 
       "accordianed" on hard landing.  Mission otherwise successful.
[23] First stage landed at CC LZ-1.
[24] F9 and AMOS 6 destroyed in explosion during hot fire countdown at SLC 40. 
       Launch was planned for 09/03/16.
[25] First stage landed downrange on drone ship "Just Read the Instructions".
-----------------------------------------------------------------------



References

Falcon 9 Data Sheet, SpaceX, 2008
Falcon 9 Users Guide, SpaceX, 2009, updated 2015
Falcon Family Brochure, SpaceX, 2011
Updates at www.spacex.com
Updates on Elon Musk Twitter page
Tom Mueller (SpaceX VP) comments at August 2011 Joint Propulsion Conference
"Iridium NOW & NEXT", IDG Aero Satcom Seminar -- Stockholm, Sweden, Jeffrey White, Iridium Director EMEA & Russia, March 9, 2012
Draft Environmental Impact Statement, SpaceX Texas Launch Site, Vol 1&2, April 2013
SpaceX web site www.spacex.com